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2012/04/16 / ラルスGEM・Rarusu Chin

the Japanese KoSoADo: This, That, and That Over There

In a society of Japanese language study, there is this popular term known as KOSOADO. Used widely by most Japanese language teachers in a classroom setting.

This is in short for: Kore, Sore, Are, and Dore

It is one of the most basic parts in studying Japanese language. Below will be a short discussion or summary about KOSOADO.

But before we proceed, let’s first start off with a short review on our vocabulary.

Japanese English
Watashi I me
Watashi no my
Watashi no pen my pen
Anata you
Anata no your
Anata no pen your pen

Kore

Is used to refer to a thin/object that is close to you.

In English this is equivalent to THIS.

Example: (refer to picture above) Observe that the person A is the one holding the pen. So Person A used KORE in referring about the pen.

Japanese: KORE wa watashi no pen desu.
English: THIS is my pen.

Sore

Is used to refer to a thing/object that is close to the person you are talking to.

In English this is equivalent to THAT.

Example: (refer to picture above) Observe that Person B is not holding the pen but is referring to it and pointing at it because he is a bit far from the object. So person B used SORE.

Japanese: SORE wa watashi no pen desu.
English: THAT is my pen.

Are

Is use to refer to a subject or thing that is far from you and the person you’re talking with.

In English this is equivalent to “that one over there”.

Example: (refer to picture above) Observe that person C & D are both far from the object/subject. So ARE is used in their situation.

Japanese: ARE wa watashi no pen desu.
English: THAT ONE OVER THERE is my pen.

There is also an expression Dore which is equivalent to WHICH in English.

Let’s see how doreis used in sentences:

1)

Japanese: Dore desu ka

English: Which one is it?

2)

Japanese: Dore ga anata no pen desu ka

English: Which one is your pen?

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One Comment

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  1. xinechan / Apr 16 2012 10:37 AM

    interesting

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